1948: Candy Bomber raids Berlin

Even though few Berliners personally remember the spectacle of giant planes loaded to the roof with coal or food, sliding smoothly between the houses into Tempelhof, Gatow and Tegel airports, this critical chapter in the cold war still remains well-known here.

It was today in 1948 that Gail Halvorsen officially started parachuting candy to children as part of the Berlin Air lift.

Earlier this year Berliners marked the 70th anniversary of the famous airlift that defeated the Russian blockade of their city with a festival at the iconic Templehof Airport.

Up to 50,000 guests attended the event on May 12.

Even though few Berliners personally remember the spectacle of giant planes loaded to the roof with coal or food, sliding smoothly between the houses into Tempelhof, Gatow and Tegel airports, this critical chapter in the cold war still remains well-known here.

The airlift, which ran during 1948 and 1949, saw British planes fly more than 530,000 tons of food, coal, fuel and other goods to West Berlin in an effort to break a Soviet stranglehold on the city. The United States, New Zealand and Australia also ran similar missions into Berlin at the same time.