Egypt rejects Turkish political, military interventions in Arab countries

Egypt rejected on Saturday Turkey’s political and military interventions in Arab affairs, stressing that such interventions lack legal basis.

The Turkish interventions violate the UN Security Council resolutions, whether in Iraq, Syria, or Libya, said Ahmed Hafez, spokesman for the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in a statement.

He expressed surprise that the Turkish administration is “risking the fortunes of the Turkish people” through intervention and involvement in the Arab countries’ crises to exacerbate and further complicate them.

On Thursday, Egypt’s President Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi vowed that his country will not stand idle in the face of any direct threats to the security of Egypt and Libya.

Sisi made the remarks during his meeting in Cairo with Libyan tribal leaders who are allied to the eastern-based Libyan National Army (LNA) led by Khalifa Haftar.

The tribesmen authorized the Egyptian president and Egyptian army to intervene in Libya to protect its sovereignty.

On June 20, Sisi threatened to send troops to Libya to protect “Egypt’s national security” as fighting between the Libyan rivals intensified.

Sisi also warned that Libya’s Sirte and al-Jafra, which are currently under the control of LNA, are a “red line” in terms of Egypt’s national security.

His remarks came almost two weeks after he announced an initiative, dubbed the Cairo Declaration, to end the Libyan conflict.

The plan was welcomed and backed by the United States, Russia, the European Union and most of the Arab countries.

Libya has been locked in a civil war since the ouster and killing of former leader Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.

The situation escalated in 2014, splitting power between two rivals with warring forces, namely the UN-backed Government of National Accord based in the capital Tripoli and the eastern-based Haftar-led LNA.